Choices…Choices

It’s a sobering thought when you realize how close you came to possible death from someone’s carelessness. Let me explain.

This morning I was driving My Favorite Domer (AKA college guy) around town on a few errands — some for him, some for me. Now, at age 20, he’s perfectly capable of driving himself, but since we both had errands to run, it just seemed the sensible (and frugal!) thing to go together.

And it was my car.

I was traveling east along a mostly residential, tree-lined street when suddenly, from the corner of my eye, I saw a white bus lunge forward from a Stop sign on my left.

This was one of those “senior citizen” buses the county operates, something they use to pick up the elderly and disabled and take them to doctor’s appointments, the grocery store, Wal-Mart, and other places.

Since there was nothing immediately behind me, I stopped my car and SAT on the horn, waiting to get the other driver’s attention.

Eventually, she must have noticed because she, too, stopped — after crossing the westbound lane and nearly touching the center line of the road I was on.

You’d have thought she’d been all apologetic. After all, it was her mistake.

But no.

She started screaming at me, flailing her arms in an angry manner, and making all sorts of ugly faces.

At me.

Okay, you didn’t expect me to take it without a fight, did you?

I screamed a few choice words back at her — nothing my son hadn’t heard before! — then promptly got out of her way.

The more I thought about it, the angrier I became.

So after I got home, I picked up the phone and called the agency responsible for those buses and drivers.

A dispatcher, hearing that I had a complaint, transferred me to the director, and I gave her a blow-by-blow account of what happened. I assured her I didn’t want to be responsible for someone losing her job in this lousy economy; neither did I want to see a bunch of old or disabled folks killed from the carelessness of one of their bus operators.

You did the right thing, the director told me. We can’t correct a problem if we don’t know about it. We’ll take it from here.

I hope so. I really hope so.

Tell me, what would you have done?