This Christmas

Our hearts grow tender with childhood memories and love of kindred, and we are better throughout the year for having, in spirit, become a child again at Christmastime. ~Laura Ingalls Wilder, American writer

To be a child at Christmastime!
To once again behold this world
With awe. And joy. And hope. And love.

Or to be an adult at Christmastime!
Shopping for gifts and wrapping them, too.
Cooking the meal, cleaning up, and sneaking a nap.

Or to be a bush at Christmastime!
Covered in white, listening to the universe.
Perhaps shivering a bit under the snow.

Note: Whatever your role this holiday season, I wish you and yours a most blessed Christmas, with a happy and healthy 2021 to come! I’m taking a wee blogging break — back soon.

Standing Out

I like trees because they seem more resigned to the way they have to live than other things do. ~Willa Cather, American writer

How do you like my pretty dress?

It’s red, as you can plainly see.

In it, I become a princess.

No crown, no robe, no throne for me.

Too soon my leaves are going to flee

And all my branches will be bare.

So share my joy with utter glee

And when I’m nude, try not to stare!

 

Note: Poetry form is Huitain.

 

Cycle of Life

Though we travel the world over to find the beautiful, we must carry it with us or we find it not. ~Ralph Waldo Emerson, American essayist and poet

Frost
Whitens
Fallen leaves.
Outlines their veins,
Bestows a beauty
Gone since they turned color
Earlier in the season.
Something sad about the Autumn
When trees become bare and look like sticks.
As they prepare to rest for several months.

Don’t cry because leaves are not here today.
They served a purpose and now they’re gone.
Nestled together on the ground,
Sheltering grass and insects,
Enhancing the landscape.
Perpetuating
And renewing
The cycle
Of life —
Mulch.

Note: This poetic form is a Double Etheree.

Nearly Wordless Wednesday

If nothing ever changed, there’d be no butterflies. ~Author Unknown

7:20 a.m.

As
Sunlight
Appears, we
Can see changes
In our surroundings.
Twenty minutes apart:
And the leaves begin to glow.
The sky becomes a denim blue,
And color washes over our world.
A new day has dawned for us to enjoy.

7:51 a.m.

We are each gifted in a unique and important way. It is our privilege and our adventure to discover our own special light.  ~Evelyn Dunbar, British artist, illustrator, and teacher

Note: This poetic form is an Etheree.

Redbud — Tree or Shrub?

When life gives you a hundred reasons to cry, show life that you have a thousand reasons to smile.  ~Author Unknown

What’s a homeowner to do when landscaping doesn’t go the way it’s supposed to?

When trees that are supposed to grow tall, don’t? When things planted as trees become shrubs instead?

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Walktober 2020

Thoughts come clearly while one walks. ~Thomas Mann, German novelist and 1929 Nobel Prize in Literature laureate

It’s time once again for the annual Walktober, hosted by Robin of Breezes at Dawn.

Today, we’re in Central Illinois, where a prolonged drought has stressed trees and produced a faster color change than what typically takes until mid-October to peak.

Nevertheless, it’s a beautiful day — temps in the low 70s, sunny and clear — so let’s hop into our sneakers and head outside for a two-mile stroll.

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Corny Time

If you truly love Nature, you will find beauty everywhere. ~Vincent Van Gogh, Dutch painter

Happy Thursday!

The corn, as you can see, has tasseled. This is a crop of field corn near where I live. It’s NOT sweet corn, which features full, round, white and light yellow kernels and is planted for human consumption.

Did you know only about one percent of the corn grown on American farms is sweet corn? I didn’t either. But yes, the bulk of our corn is field corn, which you wouldn’t want to eat.

Field corn has dryer, more golden kernels (often with a small dent) and is processed for use in foods with corn ingredients (cereals, chips, etc.), as animal feed, or saved as seed for next year’s crop. It’s also used for non-food things like ethanol.

Sweet corn is generally available July through September, weeks before field corn. In fact, field corn stalks must completely dry out, the silks at the top of each ear turn dark brown, and the ears flip down with the silks toward the ground before a plant is ready for harvest (October-November, usually).

It’s a delicate balance, with farmers sometimes having to rush to get their crops harvested before winter sets in.

Speaking of time, I’m going to take a few days off — the Domer has promised to visit, and I understand there’s a birthday cake with my name on it! Don’t forget me — I’ll be back soon!