Sunday’s Gem — Aquamarine

Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better. ~Albert Einstein

The traditional birthstone for March is the beautiful Aquamarine, a transparent bluish member of the beryl family.

Thanks to healingcrystals.com for this photo of an uncut chunk of Aquamarine

From the Latin for “water of the sea,” Aquamarine once was valued as a green stone; today, it’s traditionally heated to bring out the blue hues the public demands.

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Wishing, Hoping

Hope is the physician of each misery. ~Irish Proverb

Fed up with winter

Longing for warm sandy beach

Need a vacation!

Note: This is my rendition of I’d Rather Be…, WordPress’s Photo Challenge for the week. We’re supposed to photograph something we’d rather be doing, or a place we’d rather be, right now. Mine is on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, and I suspect I’m not the only one eager for a change in seasons!

New Season Emerging

Adopt the pace of nature:  her secret is patience.  ~Ralph Waldo Emerson, American poet

My Daffodils are peeking through, and I find myself eagerly awaiting the arrival of Spring! Yes, it will be weeks before these babies bloom and the temperatures stay consistently warm, but now that I see progress, it’s easier to be patient.

I found the following quote in a publication I was reading and decided it was appropriate for ALL of us (but especially those of us trying to write a book!) Have a beautiful Sunday, my friends!

Have patience with all things — but first with yourself. Never confuse your mistakes with your value as a human being. You are a perfectly valuable, creative, worthwhile person simply because you exist. And no amount of triumphs or tribulations can ever change that. — St. Francis de Sales, patron saint of authors, writers, and journalists

Storied Tradition

On football weekend Fridays, guests of the University of Notre Dame Fighting Irish can walk — for free! — the tunnel every Irish football player has taken into Notre Dame Stadium since the Knute Rockne era in 1930.

View the hanging national championship banners, take a photo with the field in the background, and imagine what it’s like to race into the stadium to the rousing Notre Dame Victory March and the cheers of thousands of fans!

Note: This is my take on Story, this week’s WordPress Photo Challenge topic. The idea is to use a photograph to convey a story. Kind of relates to the English idiom, “A picture is worth a thousand words,” don’t you think?

Sharing the Sorrow

A suburban mother’s role is to deliver children obstetrically once, and by car forever after. ~Peter De Vries, American editor and novelist

We’ve got to find a better way of teaching our kids how to drive.

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Nature is Industrious

God gives every bird its food, but He does not throw it into its nest. ~J.G. Holland, American novelist and poet

Clever Miss Spider
Spinning a delicate web
To catch her dinner.

Note: This is my interpretation for the weekly Photo Challenge by Word Press. The idea is to take something familiar and make it look Out of This World. I took this shot early one summer’s morning after a particularly heavy dew (hence, the cottonball objects scattered throughout!).

Rushing To and Fro

Once you stop rushing through life, you will be amazed how much more life you have time for. ~Author Unknown

Chipmunk scurrying
Where ya goin’, Little Guy?
Too busy to talk.

Note: I’m participating in WordPress’s 2018 Photo Challenge. This week’s topic is A Face in the Crowd. I took this shot while visiting the Chicago Botanic Garden with my son a couple of years ago and this seems as good a chance as I might ever have to show it to you.

Sweet Dessert

Deliciously sweet

Booze, mint, cream, and Oreos

St. Patrick’s Day treat

 

Note: I’m participating in the WordPress Photo Challenge for 2018. This week’s topic is Sweet, and you have until next Wednesday if you’d like to participate. For anyone interested in making this yummy Southern dessert called Grasshopper Pie, here’s one recipe.

Sunday’s Gem — Ruby

Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better. ~Albert Einstein

One of four “precious” gemstones (the others being Diamond, Sapphire, and Emerald), Ruby is red Corundum, an aluminum oxide mineral with chromium responsible for its rich, red color.

Considered by many to be the most powerful gemstone in the universe, Ruby ranges from an orangey-red to a purplish or brownish red. The most prized color is “pigeon’s blood,” pure red with a hint of blue.

Unheated rubies from Mozambique; photo from http://www.gemstoneuniverse.com

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